Maintaining Relationships with Chronic Illness

Friendships and other relationships drastically change once you have been diagnosed with a chronic illness.  You probably are no longer physically able to spend as much time with friends as you used to, especially when most of the activities you participated in before were tiring. As a results, friends that never made a huge effort in your life before quickly stopping keeping in touch. This is because those friendships suddenly required more effort and for those people to actually be proactive, by picking up the phone or coming over, for example.

It is a painful process of losing people but the more your health worsens, the more people you lose.   But you also get to choose which relationships to end as well.  Some people weren’t the greatest friends to start with and being sick has allowed you to see your life through a new and different perspective.

You now choose a calm, positive and healthy environment where stress is at a minimum rather than dealing with trivial events, petty concerns and fake people. You are trying to create a healthy lifestyle despite the suffering that chronic illness and pain has brought to your life.  And that means being proactive about who you surround yourself with.

Remember this is your life.  You are the one is who is sick and it is up to you to shape relationships in the way that works for your health and to control the factors that you can control.  Cherish the people that stick around and stop by to help out and who keep inviting you even though you decline their invites.

For the people who stick around, it definitely isn’t easy and there are expectations of all parties involved.  And chronic illness means continuous change so loved ones need our help in how to best help and what expectations we have.

Read more about taking the responsibility to stay connected with chronic illness at: http://www.arthritisconnect.com/arthritis-articles/478-staying-connected-with-arthritis#L6Z8DA25CrkYr4Rx.97

Nine Things Chronically Ill People Want Loved Ones to Know

There are many things a chronically ill person wants their loved ones to know but are hesitant to share.

Nine Things Chronically Ill People Want Loved Ones to Know

 Chronic illnesses are debilitating and strike people of all ages and sexes. Loved ones are confused on how to offer help and support while chronically ill patients struggle with sharing feelings. There are many things a chronically ill person wants their loved ones to know but are hesitant to share.

Here are nine things chronically ill people want their loved ones to know:

1. Our grief is ongoing

Angie, age 17: “I wish my parents understood that my grief over my health is reoccurring. It is gone sometimes, but it always returns.”

Before getting sick, you don’t know the ongoing struggles that force you to continually grieve. And there is a lot to grieve over. You are not as productive as you once were. You have lost friends, the ability to take part in your favorite activities and your independence. Grief comes in waves and sometimes, out of the blue. One minute, you are accepting the changes and challenges that chronic illness brings to your life, and the next, you are overcome with sadness or anger.

Read more at http://www.diabeticconnect.com/diabetes-information-articles/general/1024-nine-things-chronically-ill-people-want-loved-ones-to-know#HSua2bCQ7VDqAlXq.99

Nine Things Chronically Ill People Want Loved Ones to Know

There are many things a chronically ill person wants their loved ones to know but are hesitant to share.

Nine Things Chronically Ill People Want Loved Ones to Know

Chronic illnesses are debilitating and strike people of all ages and sexes. Loved ones are confused on how to offer help and support while chronically ill patients struggle with sharing feelings. There are many things a chronically ill person wants their loved ones to know but are hesitant to share.

Here are nine things chronically ill people want their loved ones to know:

1. Our Grief is Ongoing

Angie, age 17: “I wish my parents understood that my grief over my health is reoccurring. It is gone sometimes but it always returns.”

Before getting sick, you don’t know the ongoing struggles that force you to continually grieve. And there is a lot to grieve over. You are not as productive as you once were. You have lost friends, the ability to take part in your favorite activities and your independence. Grief comes in waves and sometimes, out of the blue. One minute, you are accepting the changes and challenges that chronic illness brings to your life and the next you are overcome with sadness or anger.

READ MORE.

How One Family Manages With the Chronic Illness of a Child

Chronic illnesses are most common in adults but they affect people of all ages — including children.

How One Family Manages With the Chronic Illness of a Child

Seven percent of American children today live with at least one chronic illness. That number is a significant increase from 1.8 percent in the 1960s, this according to theNational Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

Raising a child with a chronic illness affects the entire family. Parents may feel guilt and anger while siblings may feel neglected. Depending on the illness, a sick child may experience symptoms of discomfort and pain. Moreover, treatments for the illness may be scary, painful and uncomfortable. Parents may also struggle with watching their child being sick and in distress. Further, illness strains finances and demands time, energy and resources.

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Communicating Concern and Support for Loved Ones in Pain

How to maintain a successful relationships with family members and friends

Communicating Concern and Support for Loved Ones in Pain

The Institute of Medicine reports that 100 million Americans suffer from conditions that result in chronic pain. Chronic pain conditions are often difficult to diagnose and treat because each person’s pain is unique.

Communication becomes vital to achieving and maintaining successful relationships with family members and friends for patients living with pain. This isn’t always easy because, often times, patients struggle to find the necessary dialogue to describe pain and feelings while loved ones struggle with their reactions.

Reluctance

Communication, or the lack of it, stands out for many living with chronic illness and pain and for their loved ones. It is an issue that causes frustration for all parties and people with chronic illness and pain communicate differently than those who aren’t sick.

There is a reluctance to communicate physical and emotional symptoms. Further, chronically ill people often say they are feeling “well” or “okay” despite the fact they are hurting. Sometimes, there is no way to describe how someone is feeling and other times, the chronically ill person just wants to be left alone. These obstacles are challenging and result in the breakdown in communication.

Communicating with a Loved One in Pain

People who live with pain do best when loved ones express concern for their hurting and offer support that is genuinely needed. Here are five ways you can communicate concern and support.

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Five Facts You Need to Help Loved Ones with Chronic Pain Conditions

Living with a chronic illness is difficult, learn what you can do to help

Five Facts You Need to Help Loved Ones with Chronic Pain Conditions

The challenges posed by illness and pain are obvious to fellow chronic illness suffers but healthy people don’t know what these are. In fact, most are often misinformed about the daily battle faced by people with chronic pain diseases.

By understanding how pain and illness work, you can better grasp what chronically illness patients go through on a daily basis. Here are five facts you to need to understand to help loved ones who live with chronic illness and pain.

1 – Illness and Pain are Exhausting. Constantly fighting to regain our health and living with symptoms and pain is hard work. Sometimes, the need to be and act like healthy people is so strong that we push ourselves to do what our bodies reasonably cannot do. More often, however, we try to find a middle ground between managing our health and gently challenging our bodies so we don’t fall in the pattern of overexerting ourselves. But that requires constant accessing and adjusting and that, too, can be both physically and mentally tiring.

How you can help: You can start by checking your own patience. You cannot expect someone who is dealing with daily pain and illness to just get over what they are going through. A chronic illness sufferer may not help out as often or have to cancel plans at the last minute but you can help by not taking this personally. Think about how lucky you are that you are still physically able to still enjoy the things you love.

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