Take Time to Pamper Yourself With Chronic Illness

The holidays can take a lot out of you. Don’t forget to make time for yourself.

Take Time to Pamper Yourself With Chronic Illness

Lana Barhum is a legal assistant, patient advocate, freelance writer, blogger, and single parent. She has lived with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia since 2008 and uses her experiences to share expert advice on living successfully with chronic illness.

Everyone needs to practice self-love and self-care regularly. And for those of us with health issues, this is even more important. Pampering yourself is one of the best ways to relieve stress, and it could help you manage your chronic condition’s symptoms too.

Most of us tell ourselves that we are too busy, or we find other excuses to put off pampering ourselves. But unless we intentionally make the time and remove guilt, we will only keep telling ourselves the same lies and not give ourselves the attention we need.

Find the time

If your life is as overscheduled as most are, it can be difficult to find time for yourself. Your lunch hour is a good time to focus on yourself. Or try waking up a little earlier than everyone else, or temporarily disconnecting from your gadgets.

You don’t have to find big chunks of time; just start off small and see what happens. Hopefully, the more time you steal to pamper yourself, the more often you will want to do it.

Read more at http://www.diabeticconnect.com/diabetes-information-articles/general/2263-take-time-to-pamper-yourself-with-chronic-illness#GsLTw4YAWibZ4VW6.99

7 Realities for People With Chronic Illness

How we face the misconceptions and stigma around fibromyalgia.

7 Realities for People With Chronic Illness

“Disabled” and “handicapped” aren’t two words society often associates with people who aren’t visibly disabled, but live with chronic illness and pain. There is a notion that in order to be sick, there must be evident, visible signs, such as assistive devices or mobility issues. Our society often ignores the existence of chronic illness, especially when diseases are invisible and/or don’t fit in the mainstream ideal of what being sick should look like.

At least 10 percent of the United States population is considered invisibly disabled according to Disabled World. The outside world sees chronically ill people as normal and assumes they function at the same level as healthy people do because their symptoms are often not seen.

Read more at http://www.fibromyalgiaconnect.com/fibromyalgia-articles/484-7-realities-for-people-with-chronic-illness#zyqsrdvfVBtcZAJY.99

5 Ways to Have a Social Life With Chronic Illness

 5 Ways to Have a Social Life With Fibromyalgia

Lana Barhum is a legal assistant, patient advocate, freelance writer, blogger, and single parent. She has lived with rheumatoid arthritis and fibromyalgia since 2008 and uses her experiences to share expert advice on living successfully with chronic illness.

Research indicates that people with chronic illness don’t participate as much in social activities and instead prefer private time, normally spent alone. However, people with chronic illness can benefit from having a healthy social life, according to a study of 250 adults published in The Journals of Gerontology. In the study, older adults who continued to participate in social activities, even after limitations made it more challenging to do so, had a more positive outlook on life than those who weren’t participating. This doesn’t just apply to older adults—young adults aren’t participating either. In fact, many are frustrated and angry about their inability to be socially and physically active.

Read more at http://www.fibromyalgiaconnect.com/fibromyalgia-articles/491-5-ways-to-have-a-social-life-with-fibromyalgia#xyeg1BsDJkmkKLIB.99